Boeing reschedules 787 Dreamliner first flight, delivery

EVERETT, Wash., 12 Dec. 2008. Boeing officials announced an updated schedule for the company's 787 Dreamliner program that moves the commercial jet's first flight into the second quarter of 2009 and first delivery into the first quarter of 2010. The new schedule reflects the impact of disruption caused by the recent machinists' strike along with the requirement to replace certain fasteners in early production airplanes.

"Our industry team has made progress with structural testing, systems hardware qualification, and production, but we must adjust our schedule for these two unexpected disruptions," says Boeing Commercial Airplanes President and CEO Scott Carson.

Prior to the strike that halted much of the company's commercial airplane work from early September into November, the 787 was to make its first flight late in the fourth quarter of 2008. First delivery was slated for the third quarter of 2009.

"We're laser focused on what needs to be done to prepare for first flight," says Pat Shanahan, 787 program vice president. "We will overcome this set of circumstances as we have others in the past, and we understand clearly what needs to be done moving forward."

Included in the preparations for first flight, Shanahan says, are finalizing and incorporating remaining engineering changes and completing systems testing, qualifications, and certification.

Boeing officials are evaluating the specific impact of this delay on customer delivery dates and will provide customers with updated schedules once completed. The company is also determining any financial impact from this schedule change and will incorporate that into updated financial and overall airplane delivery guidance that will be released at a later date.

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